Week 9: Writers and Their Tales

Personally, I did not contribute any of my own unique work this week for one reason: Most of the stories I write are long in length and I am too tasked as it is with school and work to come up with something that wouldn’t be too long-winded for you to read. I like to be detail oriented in all of my work if I am able to, so I’ll be thankful I wasn’t forced to contribute.

To begin, I liked how the focus of this week was actually writing. How we contributed through small posts, listening to the immense level of talent that a number of individuals in or class possess and analyzed the writing of our more recent generation of writers. In all honesty, listening to the people that spoke during our last class, I felt as though I was put to shame. Most of the readings were poems, that is an area that I never excelled in and school has never had a problem telling me. I excel more in writing lengthily and descriptively, may that apply to articles, research papers, or short-/long-stories. I always like to think that I never assume about someone that I don’t know to a degree, but I feel like I underestimated the potential of a good amount of people in our class after hearing the stories/poems that they shared. Had time not been a factor I would have like to share one of my works.

Regarding this week’s video meet so much was said, and of course I would have liked to have heard more but the time constraint, again, always seems to put an end to things when we’ve all gotten comfortable enough to speak amongst each other without holding back. I was surprised to hear that the Young Writers Project site has amassed 400,000 posts and comments since 2006, it says something about one’s courage and determination to have their voice and talent heard. It was fascinating to hear that among all the people who were a part of the video, Adelle, someone who is home-schooled just came upon it by chance versus all the students in the video who were obviously given a formal introduction by their teachers. I found it funny how some of the sixth grade children in the video were more willing to share their work on Young Writers Project than share their work openly among others. Perhaps that lack of physical presence and ignorance of immediate judgement is what draws the line for them. I can’t know that for sure, but that is often the case for many individuals who are self-conscious about their work. With what Alan asked regarding how people create a story and/or how it affect one’s process with writing, I would say it all really depends on how confident and head strong an individual is when it comes to writing about something specifically. With what Geoffrey had to say about one’s creative voice, I agree with what he said in how school somewhat stifles people from conveying themselves in their own creative way. That earlier along the line in school your teachers make you believe that the formal framework they are told to teach is the only way in which things should be done, or written in this case, and over time it’s just something that stay with some people.

Overall, this week gave me a lesson as to the many different ways in which people think and write and it was all quite influential. It was nice to hear such compelling passages straight from the respective sources’ mouths rather than just reading it for a change and it has motivated me to expand upon how I write. I hope in the classes that we have left together I will discover more about my peers as well as other sources of untapped potential for my viewing pleasure.

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2 thoughts on “Week 9: Writers and Their Tales”

  1. I regret so much, Alex, that I missed the readings in class. Everyone I have talked to or read said it was quite moving. We certainly did not intend people to feel pressured to participate, and that was the surprise that so many did. I would like to think that comes from both overcoming one’s own worries of speaking in public and their trust for people in the room.

    Hey, let us judge whether something is too long to read! Just kidding. Sort of. I am pleased that you have convictions on the kind of writing you prefer doing, and I encourage you to hone that craft. The other voice in my shoulder says though, that’s helpful to occasionally push yourself to do something a bit out of your preference zone. It could be perhaps not an entire work of yours, but an opening or selection?

    Just saying I’d like a chance to read some.

    Keep on keeping on.

    Like

  2. School, at all levels, too often puts us into boxes, and we can get stuck with those labels for life, right? So what that school did not see you as a poet? Write something, call it a poem, and you are a poet. I appreciated your insights about YWP, and the way its space is home for writers, maybe escaping those same school labels I just mentioned (*says the public school teacher)
    Kevin, out in the open

    Like

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